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NPS, Customer Centricity and Employee Engagement

NPS, Customer Centricity and Employee Engagement

“When an organisation is committed to creating a culture of customer centricity, those employees who want to share in the journey will respond positively with a sense of increased engagement”


The days when Net Promoter Scores (NPS) was touted as a short-lived C-Suite fad are long behind us. There is no denying that NPS and NPS Programs now have a solid foothold within organisations around the world (Apple, Qantas, GE to name a few) and it’s unlikely to be fading away any time soon.

The focus of NPS has traditionally been two-dimensional – the customer and the organisation. The customer provides feedback, the organisation listens and improves, resulting in better experiences for the customers. At the coal-face of these improvements though are generally the organisation’s employees.

There will be always be a handful who resist change, but on the most part, when an organisation is committed to creating a culture of customer centricity, those employees who want to share in the journey will respond positively with a sense of increased engagement.

The design and implementation of the NPS program itself can also impact the engagement of the organisations employees. Simply put, NPS can be used as a carrot or stick, and it is common sense that employees will be more engaged with a constructive program rather than detrimental program. (Read: 4 ways you may be sabotaging your NPS Program)

A well implemented NPS program will put the customer’s feedback in the hands of those at the coal-face, and when an employee can see that they have contributed to a customer’s positive experience, this can help create job satisfaction. Naturally not all feedback will be positive, and if managed correctly this should be dealt with as an opportunity for improvement via coaching or training. NPS Whitepaper ad 300x300

A poorly implemented NPS program will see NPS treated as a single metric. NPS used as a KPI (achieve the target or fail) will deliver the wrong message to the employees, and the organisation will find it a struggle to make much of an impact in terms of engagement. (See our article”Increasing Employee Engagement” for more ideas)

I view NPS is an indicator – much like a barometer. To understand what is going on with the weather, we use the movement of barometric pressure rather than the static value. The same goes for NPS. The movement of the score should be the focus rather than the actual score. This focus will help employees avoid viewing NPS as a ‘stick’ KPI.

Finally, the sense of belonging is an important primal instinct in humans, and it’s crucial for an organisation to have its employees share its values and vision. Each one of us is a customer in some sense, and from our own experiences we know what constitutes customer satisfaction. To belong to an organisation that is striding towards improving customer satisfaction, an employee who is marching alongside is improving their engagement with each step.

 


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Jason joined the Account Management team at Resonate in 2015. He brings over 4 years of domestic and international CEM experience in Financial Services, Telecommunications and Retail industries, specialising in the design and implementation of NPS and VOC programs. Jason holds a Bachelor of Business Studies in Management from Massey University in New Zealand.

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